The Common Element
Therapeutic Massage & Luxury Spa Treatments

Modality Definitions

 

  • Acupressure: Similar to acupuncture minus the needles, Acupressure is based on the theory of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) and is implemented by stimulating the 12 meridians in the body through acupoints to provide relief by balancing yin, yang, and qi
  • Aromatherapy*: The use of essential oils and herbal compounds to promote health and wellness
  • Chair Massage: Seated massage in a therapeutic chair that cradles the face with the focus on the head, neck, back, shoulders, arms, and hands. Administered fully clothed, chair massage is perfect for public and corporate venues
  • Cranial Sacral: Developed by John Upledger D.O., Cranial Sacral aims to regulate and reset the flow of cerebral spinal fluid through therapeutic touch
  • Cupping & Running Cups**: An Eastern technique where a vacuum is created in glass cups through heat or suction and placed on the skin to facilitate soft tissue release, free connective tissue, and decrease stagnation
  • Deep Tissue: Not to be confused with “deep pressure”, Deep Tissue is very specific therapeutic work focusing on one muscle at a time. Deep muscle stripping through the length of the muscle and friction techniques are applied to the muscle’s origin and insertion to target adhesions and trigger points
  • GuaSha**: In Chinese, Gua (to scrape or scratch) Sha (syndrome or evil retained in the body) is the process of systematically scraping the surface of the skin with a traditional tool or the hands to release stagnation and promote healing
  • Luk Pra Kob*: This traditional Thai compress method combines herbs & spices, heat, and pressure for detoxification, increased circulation, treatment of skin disharmony, and reduction of pain and inflammation. Common ingredients may include but are not limited to: camphor, eucalyptus, ginger, galangal, kaffir lime, tamarind, turmeric, and sea salt
  • Lymphatic Drainage Massage: LD Massage does not address muscle tissue; its specific focus is the aiding and facilitation of the flow of lymph through the body's lymphatic system.
  • Meridian Therapy: Meridians are the energetic pathways of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) where life source energy, qi, flows. These channels have relationships with related internal organs and their energetic component
  • Myofascial: Myo (muscle) fascia (the connective tissue surrounding muscle) is soft tissue therapy for skeletal muscle pain and immobility
  • Reiki: Developed by Mikao Usui, Reiki is the gentle Japanese art of “laying on hands” to direct Universal energy through the palms to promote stress reduction, relaxation, and healing
  • Swedish Massage: Probably the most recognized form of massage in the Western world, Swedish is characterized by long flowing strokes (effleurage) designed to relax muscles while promoting circulation through the compression and gliding along muscles toward the heart
  • Structural Analysis: Your therapist evaluates the client’s posture, stance, and gait to determine the location of muscle dysfunction
  • Traditional Chinese Medicine: TCM is a 5000+ year old practice from China based on observational science incorporating a broad spectrum of acupuncture, diet, herbal medicine, TuiNa (Chinese medical massage), Qi Gong and breathing techniques
  • Trigger Point: Most often described as a “knot”, a trigger point is a tender point in the muscle tissue that radiates pain to other parts of the body
  • TuiNa: Traditional Chinese medical massage implements a variety of techniques developed over centuries, often used in conjunction with acupressure/acupuncture and TCM
  • Yin/Yang & Qi: Yin and Yang are an ancient Chinese philosophical concept describing how seemingly opposite forces are interconnected in the natural world. Qi (also ch’i, ki, prana) is “life force energy” that flows through all living things
  • 5 Element Theory: The concept of interconnectedness and phenomenon are explained through relationships; Wood, Fire, Earth, Metal and Water metaphorically represent the seasons, emotions, and organs of the body as a microcosmic philosophy

*Aromatherapy and Luk Pra Kob: These modalities incorporate a variety of ingredients including herbs, nuts, and plant materials. To ensure avoidance of unpleasant reactions, please inform the Bodywork Therapist of all allergies and sensitivities.

**Cupping and Gua Sha: These modalities may bring Sha to the surface of the skin. Sha usually takes on the appearance of a reddish to purplish rash that sometimes contains raised bumps. Although it may sound painful, any discomfort is temporary and the benefits may be helpful for treating a number of conditions such as: muscle pain, asthma, breathing issues as well as neck, shoulder, and low back pain.

Associated Bodywork & Massage Professionals
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